Removing davo, dinette, setee?

pvfjr

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I'm driving five hours to get some "cores" to reupholster, and will need to remove them from the donor coach onsite. Aside from the basic and obvious tools, is there any chance I'll need anything special? Is it always straightforward to remove these furniture pieces, or are there ever any obstacles? It's fastener corrosion ever a concern? Do the bolts often need cut out? I don't know if any of the pieces are mounted using nutserts that tend to seize, or anything else like that. Thanks in advance.
 
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LarryW

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Oct 14, 2019
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If it is like the dinette in my 78 Royale, the tubular frame is bolted down to the wood structure below with 8 lag bolts. Should come out in minutes using a 9/16 socket on a ratchet with a short extension, or a light duty impact driver. HTH
 
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Mike Perez

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Oct 2, 2019
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If it is like the dinette in my 78 Royale, the tubular frame is bolted down to the wood structure below with 8 lag bolts. Should come out in minutes using a 9/16 socket on a ratchet with a short extension, or a light duty impact driver. HTH
Yep, I had all of my furniture out inside of an hour. The cabinets were a little more work.
 
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pvfjr

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If it is like the dinette in my 78 Royale, the tubular frame is bolted down to the wood structure below with 8 lag bolts. Should come out in minutes using a 9/16 socket on a ratchet with a short extension, or a light duty impact driver. HTH
Bolting into wood sounds convenient. The backside of the davo probably can't be that way, but hopefully everything else is.
 
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tmsnyder

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I just took out the front davo, dinette, and overhead cabinet.

Davo and Dinette are 1/2" hex heads, they are just lag bolts into the plywood floor and plywood behind front passenger seat. The back of the davo pivots on a bolt with a 1/2" head, need two wrenches for that.

Overhead cabinets, they are 7/16" . On mine, about 1/2 the bolts spun the insert in the aluminum frame and wouldn't come out. I had to cut off the head of the bolts. Damaged the cabinet every time. So if you take a grinder, also bring a ~6x6" piece of steel sheet metal with a ~3/4" hole in the center of it, and some duct tape. Put the bolt head through the sheet metal, tape the sheet metal to the cabinet to protect it while you grind on the bolt head. Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws holding electrical covering trim. Utility knife is handy to trim the two little tabs that the electric connector grabs onto, so it will come apart easier.

To make the aluminum insert stop spinning in the future, I drilled and installed a single pop riveted alongside the insert. On a donor coach you wouldn't need to do that but on your own you might want to b/c otherwise it might bite you later on down the road.

PS I keep editing this b/c I'm doing it right now.
 
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pvfjr

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Well we won't be doing any cabinets this weekend, but that's all very good to know. I'll be tackling cabinets at a later date, so I'll tuck that sound advice away for later.
 
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JBurt

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Oct 7, 2019
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Mike Perez is correct if the seat frames are steel tubing. The early coaches had wood frames. Those come out with a bunch of wood screws. You will also need wrenches for the seat belts. And I don't remember what size they are but I'm thinking 3/4". The couch belts on my 73 are mounted to the wall stud. HTH
 
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pvfjr

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Well, it was all pretty easy. Just 1/2" and 9/16" head lag bolts here and there. The rear setee had some large #3PH machine screws threaded through U-nuts clamping the bench to a rail on the front edge of the box it all sat atop.

The only tricky thing was extricating the couch from the hoses and wires. There were some heater hoses coming from the engine bay and running under the couch. He's got a couple mini heater cores with blowers that heat the living area. I hadn't seen those before.
 
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pvfjr

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And now for the bad news: IMG_20200125_175129.jpg

Just as I was pulling into the marina where David keeps his coach, my temps started creeping up. I still need to tow a minivan 5 hours on the way home...
 
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pvfjr

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And now for the good news:
Screenshot_20200125-175114.png
It's nothing but a false reading. The computer still knows the true temp, and the temp needle doesn't do its power-on sweep with the others. So, just 800 miles shy of 300k, that little stepper motor is dead. At least now I have an excuse to use the HUD mode on Torque Pro.
 
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