Hello from Soldotna Alaska

Frostbitten

New member
Jul 14, 2020
6
1
3
We just became proud owners of Ms Kingsley! A 78 in pretty good running order. 122K miles, runs very smooth. Interior is original except for new hardwood flooring which is hopefully not covering up any issues. We will slowly make some improvements and clean her up, but first thing is to check the brakes. I am looking for something about jacking it up but not finding anything in the forums. Any advice or where to look is really appreciated regarding jacking and brakes. Also anything about the power steering which will squeal and is jerky when stopped and turning the wheel. Other than that we are absolutely smitten with Ms Kingsley, she's a doll.
 

Christo

Administrator
Staff member
Oct 4, 2019
251
68
28
Weymouth, MA
Welcome! Here's the best accessory for jacking: https://www.gmcrvparts.com/product-p/ap40.htm. It allows you to use a bottle jack front or rear. The jacking points are as follows:

Rear: Between the left or right rear wheels under the heavy metal piece. Once the weight is supported by the jack, deflate the airbag on that side before jacking further to prevent stress to the shock absorbers.

Front: Best place to jack is in the center of the heavy front cross member (aft of the radiator support). There are two holes about 4" apart. If you can't or don't want to lift the whole front end (3+ tons), you can lift either side where the front subframe overlaps the frame. Look for the 3 bolts in the side of the frame aft of either front wheel. If you're only going to lift one side, don't raise it more than is required to remove the wheel or the windshield might crack.

Always support the coach with 4x4 blocking on a 2x6 or 2x8 base in addition to the jack (safer than jack stands).

Further info is in the operators manual and maintenance manual here: http://www.bdub.net/factory-manuals.html

Best of luck with your new coach!
 

Frostbitten

New member
Jul 14, 2020
6
1
3
Welcome! Here's the best accessory for jacking: https://www.gmcrvparts.com/product-p/ap40.htm. It allows you to use a bottle jack front or rear. The jacking points are as follows:

Rear: Between the left or right rear wheels under the heavy metal piece. Once the weight is supported by the jack, deflate the airbag on that side before jacking further to prevent stress to the shock absorbers.

Front: Best place to jack is in the center of the heavy front cross member (aft of the radiator support). There are two holes about 4" apart. If you can't or don't want to lift the whole front end (3+ tons), you can lift either side where the front subframe overlaps the frame. Look for the 3 bolts in the side of the frame aft of either front wheel. If you're only going to lift one side, don't raise it more than is required to remove the wheel or the windshield might crack.

Always support the coach with 4x4 blocking on a 2x6 or 2x8 base in addition to the jack (safer than jack stands).

Further info is in the operators manual and maintenance manual here: http://www.bdub.net/factory-manuals.html

Best of luck with your new coach!
WOW, just what i needed!!! and lightning fast. Thank you so much. I got alot to explore under there. Brakes, exhaust leak, wheel bearings and learning how this front drive axle works and it's condition. Thank you again.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Christo

bdub

Active member
Oct 8, 2019
121
36
28
68
Lake Brownwood, Texas
www.bdub.net
Jerky steering can be caused by several things. The windshield wiper filter being plugged up. Filter is a fine screen inside the 3" or so 1/4" nipple going into the hydraulic wiper motor. Remove, clean it out, replace.
The cv joint in the steering shaft might be dry. It should have a rubber boot on it to keep water and dust out. Prior to removing, mark it so that you can put it back EXACTLY as removed. Clean it up and re-grease it with Valvoline SynPower grease with Moly (MSO2).
The 6 sided shaft slip joint can be binding. Grease it well. If it's stuck and will not slide, you'll have to take it apart to clean it up. Be careful of that blie plastic coating on the shaft as it very difficult and expensive to replace.
Make sure the connections on either side of the steering gearbox are tight.

Welcome to the GMC family! :)

=============================

For the purpose of locating and keeping track of all Classic GMC Motorhomes. There are currently over 8400 GMCs accounted for.
Please fill out and submit the online form at www.gmcmhregistry.com

* Note about the Build Date of your GMC: From the decal on the inside of the glove box door - look for a number on the top line just left of center, similar to "032174". The example indicates the build date as March 21st, 1974. *
============================
 

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
322
74
28
South East Michigan near DTW
Frost,

Welcome to the group, family, cult, asylum......

The squeal of the power steering belt is an almost perpetual condition, but it is exacerbated by having the wrong belt. The wrong belts are now much easier to get than the correct part. It is also very difficult to set the tension of that belt. What ever you do, do not use the tank to tension this belt or it will leak ever and anon. This belt can better be set with the alternator belt loosened.

We can be a lot more help (what help we can be from 2000 miles away) if you tell us what documentation you have. What you are missing can be downloaded at GMCMI .

Also, note that most of us run a big sigfiles. This is so anybody that might choose to provide assistance or information knows exactly where the starting point is. Both this and the older GMCnet are populated by owners some of whom has vast experience. There is also a lot of GMC/TZE traffic on Facebook. I caution here, thought some of us do write there, there are many that do that have limited real experience that relates properly.

Matt
 

Frostbitten

New member
Jul 14, 2020
6
1
3
Frost,

Welcome to the group, family, cult, asylum......

The squeal of the power steering belt is an almost perpetual condition, but it is exacerbated by having the wrong belt. The wrong belts are now much easier to get than the correct part. It is also very difficult to set the tension of that belt. What ever you do, do not use the tank to tension this belt or it will leak ever and anon. This belt can better be set with the alternator belt loosened.

We can be a lot more help (what help we can be from 2000 miles away) if you tell us what documentation you have. What you are missing can be downloaded at GMCMI .

Also, note that most of us run a big sigfiles. This is so anybody that might choose to provide assistance or information knows exactly where the starting point is. Both this and the older GMCnet are populated by owners some of whom has vast experience. There is also a lot of GMC/TZE traffic on Facebook. I caution here, thought some of us do write there, there are many that do that have limited real experience that relates properly.

Matt
Thanks for your help on the ps info. Once I get under it I'll follow your advice. We were so excited we forgot about the title! I will get that soon and then I'll have the vin# and figure out the sigfiles which I have no experience with. Haven't run across the vin on the coach yet. also need a good bottle jack and looking for recommendations.,
 

Christo

Administrator
Staff member
Oct 4, 2019
251
68
28
Weymouth, MA
I have heard the ford 4 ton bottle jack is the hot ticket.
It's a great 2-stage jack for corner jacking, but the minimum clearance is 7-3/8" so it won't fit under the front crossmember, especially if you need to set it on a 2x8. A floor jack works better for this job, and it's safer because you don't have to get under the coach to position it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: stephan ashe

Frostbitten

New member
Jul 14, 2020
6
1
3
But a decent sized floor jack is nearly $400 with shipping. I'll get a stubby 20t bottle jack for $50 from northern tool.
 

Christo

Administrator
Staff member
Oct 4, 2019
251
68
28
Weymouth, MA
But a decent sized floor jack is nearly $400 with shipping. I'll get a stubby 20t bottle jack for $50 from northern tool.
Note, that one only lifts 3". Also, anytime you're going to crawl under the coach, front or rear, be sure to insert safety blocking in case the suspension gives way.
 

6cuda6

Active member
Oct 3, 2019
442
107
43
53
Ontario, Canada
Welcome to the fold and as you can see there is plenty of info to help...never be afraid to ask a question.

There is also a video on UTube by the GMC Co-Op about jacking the coach and placing jack stands if you are more of a visual person.

As for jack, i personally use a 3 ton bottle jack with and extendable ram end [just screws in and out] nothing fancy, its probably an old Sears or Harbor Freight item...... plus i can keep it in the coach when we travel. it lifts the vehicle high enough to change tires etc [for the rear i just raise the suspension to get it under the boggie box]. Some may scoff at it but i never ever am under the coach without safety stands or cribbing blocks, the only thing that i have to do when using it under the front cross member is put my piece of rear jacking leaf spring between it and the beam to keep it from denting the beam as it lifts. Looks something like this, only a bit older:
:jack.PNG
Disclaimer: I am a licensed mechanic and am trained to properly lift and secure a vehicle....if you are in any way unsure of your ability to perform the task safely please get assistance. I am in no way responsible for your actions therefore any damage to your property or person is solely upon yourself or the individual lifting the vehicle.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: tmsnyder

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
322
74
28
South East Michigan near DTW
Frosty,

I first joined this threat mid-way and missed that you were stuck on lifting the coach. Join GMCnet and search on lifting. I wrote a lot about what I had to learn a long the way, and/or if you send something to <matt7323tze at gmail dot com> I will send you the piece that is a refinement of this thread that was requested for the Vintage Motorhome magazine.

Please listen to those that caution you about being under a GMC that is not solidly supported. If the air suspension fails, that back of the coach can instantly crush strawberries or the snake that was hiding in them. Many of us have witnessed this and it is a real eye opener.

Matt
 

billvv

Member
Oct 2, 2019
95
22
8
77
I found ramps for the rear and a floor jack and wood pyramids for the front to be quick and effective (except for changing rear tires/wheels /brakes).
 

tmsnyder

Active member
Oct 7, 2019
422
85
28
Buffalo NY
If you're on the side of the road changing a tire or working under the coach, the other excellent bit of safety blocking I use is the wheel itself. Put it under the coach near your position under the frame. Wherever you think its going to do the most good just in case the coach decides to come down. The coach can move almost 15" either way and still hit the wheel. Any blocking I carry is less then 30" long, and much more 'tippy' than the wheel laid down on the ground. jwid


Some may scoff at it but i never ever am under the coach without safety stands or cribbing blocks, t
 

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
322
74
28
South East Michigan near DTW
How about jacking the front end up with the original jack? How bad does this mess up your bumper?

View attachment 3340
To give a straight answer form one that has done this:
Without the pad (carpet will do) it will damage the chrome. No Matter What is done, it will distort the bumper mount and that mount may not return to the original position. It can be done. As I still have steel wheels, I preferred to hook into the wheel (this will damage the wheel finish) and the use the cribbing blocks I carry under the lower ball joint.
Matt