73 sequoia

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
437
111
43
South East Michigan near DTW
Welcome to the group, family, cult, asylum.......

You will quickly discover that the coach is more than a new big toy. It's real value is the community it connects you to. This can be a most amazing resource. There are multiple web venues related to TZEs (the prefix of VIN to separate it from things with a GM chassis). There is this forum that is new and easily managed, the old forum at GMCnet. While this forum is more difficult to manage, this is where the oldsters with decades of experience hang out. Then, I hope you have looked up GMCMI as that is a gateway to all manner of valuable information. If you do not have all of of the service and maintenance documentation, it can all be downloaded there. (Or join and get it all on a single thumb drive.)

As another 73 owner, I will advise you of two things:
You still have the steel 16.5*6 rims on the coach. If they are OE, they will not tolerate radial tires for long. They will crack (BTDT) and let yo down on the road. This is inconvenient as the OE jack cannot lift the front as described in the manual without damaging a bumper.
If it still has points, order up a Pertonix set number 1180LS and install them and forget about it. (If you think you want more spark power, ask me.) If it has been converted to HEI, do not use the published plug gap and ALWAYS carry a full kit of distributor parts (modules particularly have to be American made as the Pacific rim parts are very unreliable).

Do not be put off by the forwardness of others on these two forums. Think of it as just discovering a couple of thousand new old friends. If you don't believe this go over to GMCnet and read the thread of a member that is broken down someplace along the Arkansas/Missouri border. There is an effort running to get him what he needs as repaired. While breakdowns are not a common thing with a properly maintained coach, this kind of response from the community is absolutely typical. So, always carry a printed copy of the Black's list(named for the originator) when you travel.

If you venture by the GMC motorhome pages of Facebook, do not take any technical advice there without checking out at one of these forums. To date, I have counted three salvageable coaches that ended up being sold as scrap (not very much) because of the damage that was extended by the bad advice that was taken by the owner(s). Maintaining the coach is not difficult, but it is essential. If you don't have a good grease gun, you will need one.

Lastly, create and include a sigfile at both forums. GMCs are not all alike. This way, when you pose a question, we will know and recognize who you are and if it is a real name, we will know you at the rallies you will get to. A short about the coach should be included as I said, they are not all the same and major mods should be mentioned because they may matter. If a geographic reference is included, you may find that you already have a valuable friend in striking range. As said, this is a very supportive and helping community.

Matt
 

jconnor30

New member
Nov 2, 2020
8
2
3
Welcome to the group, family, cult, asylum.......

You will quickly discover that the coach is more than a new big toy. It's real value is the community it connects you to. This can be a most amazing resource. There are multiple web venues related to TZEs (the prefix of VIN to separate it from things with a GM chassis). There is this forum that is new and easily managed, the old forum at GMCnet. While this forum is more difficult to manage, this is where the oldsters with decades of experience hang out. Then, I hope you have looked up GMCMI as that is a gateway to all manner of valuable information. If you do not have all of of the service and maintenance documentation, it can all be downloaded there. (Or join and get it all on a single thumb drive.)

As another 73 owner, I will advise you of two things:
You still have the steel 16.5*6 rims on the coach. If they are OE, they will not tolerate radial tires for long. They will crack (BTDT) and let yo down on the road. This is inconvenient as the OE jack cannot lift the front as described in the manual without damaging a bumper.
If it still has points, order up a Pertonix set number 1180LS and install them and forget about it. (If you think you want more spark power, ask me.) If it has been converted to HEI, do not use the published plug gap and ALWAYS carry a full kit of distributor parts (modules particularly have to be American made as the Pacific rim parts are very unreliable).

Do not be put off by the forwardness of others on these two forums. Think of it as just discovering a couple of thousand new old friends. If you don't believe this go over to GMCnet and read the thread of a member that is broken down someplace along the Arkansas/Missouri border. There is an effort running to get him what he needs as repaired. While breakdowns are not a common thing with a properly maintained coach, this kind of response from the community is absolutely typical. So, always carry a printed copy of the Black's list(named for the originator) when you travel.

If you venture by the GMC motorhome pages of Facebook, do not take any technical advice there without checking out at one of these forums. To date, I have counted three salvageable coaches that ended up being sold as scrap (not very much) because of the damage that was extended by the bad advice that was taken by the owner(s). Maintaining the coach is not difficult, but it is essential. If you don't have a good grease gun, you will need one.

Lastly, create and include a sigfile at both forums. GMCs are not all alike. This way, when you pose a question, we will know and recognize who you are and if it is a real name, we will know you at the rallies you will get to. A short about the coach should be included as I said, they are not all the same and major mods should be mentioned because they may matter. If a geographic reference is included, you may find that you already have a valuable friend in striking range. As said, this is a very supportive and helping community.

Matt
Thank you for all this information I will need all the help I can get. I flew up to Washington state and drove it home about 1000 miles and it's only been a week of owning this girl and we are ready to get some things going on her unfortunately we will have to go a little backwards from what we where told but that is what it is. Currently it has a draw that killed the brand new battery that I just discovered yesterday and we where going to reseal all the side windows as the felts and rubbers are shot. I'll look up those forums as you suggested and again thank you.

Jack
 

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
437
111
43
South East Michigan near DTW
Jack,

Drove home 1000 miles without any big problems? That is good.
Which battery died? Both have a number of easy battery killers that are not all that hard to correct. Please tell us what you have for electrical instruments and give us a guess what your capability level is. Just a guess, somewhere between yellow canary and Edison's mentor, but whatever, we can probably help.

Some things are not what you expected? This is common with both boats and RVs. Things go bad so slowly that the PO firmly believes that what he corrected once is still good.
Speaking Of......
Start a maintenance log ->Today <-. I always break these into logical pieces. A small spiral book works best for me. If you do this right and long enough it will all be a blur in much less time than you would believe. (You mean the house bank is really 9 years old?)

I also have a list on my computer (don't ever trust a computer to keep important records) that is interesting and rewarding.
This list has six headings:
Needed Now - things not normal maintenance that should be tended to - like the window felt
Winter Jobs - things that can wait until you put her to bed for the season - we have winter here and she never gets to see road salt
Waiting - the thinks you want but have low priority - but keep in mind in case the parts or material shows up
Abandon - a place to put the things that you now see little reason to do
Deferred - well, not abandon but it can wait until you have excess time and money
Done - this is where you move things from the heading above. Add a date and separate them by year and this both helps you appreciate the progress you have made and lets you know that things are getting done. This is the best part of the page. My done list goes back a long ways.

When you have question, come to your friends. You will have to work vary hard to have an original problem.

Matt
 

jconnor30

New member
Nov 2, 2020
8
2
3
Jack,

Drove home 1000 miles without any big problems? That is good.
Which battery died? Both have a number of easy battery killers that are not all that hard to correct. Please tell us what you have for electrical instruments and give us a guess what your capability level is. Just a guess, somewhere between yellow canary and Edison's mentor, but whatever, we can probably help.

Some things are not what you expected? This is common with both boats and RVs. Things go bad so slowly that the PO firmly believes that what he corrected once is still good.
Speaking Of......
Start a maintenance log ->Today <-. I always break these into logical pieces. A small spiral book works best for me. If you do this right and long enough it will all be a blur in much less time than you would believe. (You mean the house bank is really 9 years old?)

I also have a list on my computer (don't ever trust a computer to keep important records) that is interesting and rewarding.
This list has six headings:
Needed Now - things not normal maintenance that should be tended to - like the window felt
Winter Jobs - things that can wait until you put her to bed for the season - we have winter here and she never gets to see road salt
Waiting - the thinks you want but have low priority - but keep in mind in case the parts or material shows up
Abandon - a place to put the things that you now see little reason to do
Deferred - well, not abandon but it can wait until you have excess time and money
Done - this is where you move things from the heading above. Add a date and separate them by year and this both helps you appreciate the progress you have made and lets you know that things are getting done. This is the best part of the page. My done list goes back a long ways.

When you have question, come to your friends. You will have to work vary hard to have an original problem.

Matt
Matt, those are great ideas I use some of those on my old cars I have a 31 model A roadster and a 39 Mercury so I'm use to working on older vehicles so on this girl I'm trying to do all the research I can plus learn from others who have done it. My skills are decent I've rewired 3 cars in the past including a 6volt to 12 volt conversion but am always open to learn more, I have multi meters and test lights plus any hand tool that would be needed. I just got home and pulled out the batteries the engine battery had under 12 volts on it and the gen battery was dead and low on water I have them charging the engine battery was new and put in ffg he day I flew up and the gen battery not sure how old but it might be shot but did start the gen the day I drove off in it so I'll have to see on that one. I was going to put my test light across the negative and see if I have a short and pull fuses to see if I can locate it.
 

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
437
111
43
South East Michigan near DTW
OK Jack,
You are obviously up to the task.

There is a way that I have used for years (long before I had expensive test gear) and still use in cases like this.

Solder wires with alligator clips on a small (not taillight, more like instrument light) bulb. If you have no clue where the problem is, put it between the source and the distribution. (Battery and Fuse panel) If it even glows a little, start pulling fuses until it goes out. Now you know which branch. So, reconnect the source and clip the light across the fuse holder. Now start taking things apart until it goes out. This may be tedious, but I know of no better way.

Be aware that there is every possibility that there is more than a single point failure. So, when you find and fix something, rerun the check.

Years ago, I did a lot of passcar work and a common problem was the "3 day dead battery". This was very often the failure of the switch for the hood, truck or glove compartment. If we has snow, the hood and trunk were easy to find, but one was a light in a rear seat ashtray.

If I can be more help, I'm here a lot and enjoy assisting others.
Someone asked why I do this. That is simple. I was raised as a waterman and still am. We help each other. The ocean isn't trying to kill you, but it sure doesn't care if you live. So, we help each other with little regard. I learned a lot by being lifted to the shoulders of many wonderful people, I am hoping to live long enough to pass along a good portion of both what I was taught and what I have learned the hard way.

Matt
 

jconnor30

New member
Nov 2, 2020
8
2
3
OK Jack,
You are obviously up to the task.

There is a way that I have used for years (long before I had expensive test gear) and still use in cases like this.

Solder wires with alligator clips on a small (not taillight, more like instrument light) bulb. If you have no clue where the problem is, put it between the source and the distribution. (Battery and Fuse panel) If it even glows a little, start pulling fuses until it goes out. Now you know which branch. So, reconnect the source and clip the light across the fuse holder. Now start taking things apart until it goes out. This may be tedious, but I know of no better way.

Be aware that there is every possibility that there is more than a single point failure. So, when you find and fix something, rerun the check.

Years ago, I did a lot of passcar work and a common problem was the "3 day dead battery". This was very often the failure of the switch for the hood, truck or glove compartment. If we has snow, the hood and trunk were easy to find, but one was a light in a rear seat ashtray.

If I can be more help, I'm here a lot and enjoy assisting others.
Someone asked why I do this. That is simple. I was raised as a waterman and still am. We help each other. The ocean isn't trying to kill you, but it sure doesn't care if you live. So, we help each other with little regard. I learned a lot by being lifted to the shoulders of many wonderful people, I am hoping to live long enough to pass along a good portion of both what I was taught and what I have learned the hard way.

Matt
Thank you so much I will start as you suggested sounds like we are on the same page I'll let you know how it goes.
 

jconnor30

New member
Nov 2, 2020
8
2
3
Thank you so much I will start as you suggested sounds like we are on the same page I'll let you know how it goes.
Also when you went to pertronix dud you use there flamethrower coil too? I put pertronix on my 50 merc and used there coil too.
 

Matt Colie

Active member
Oct 25, 2019
437
111
43
South East Michigan near DTW
Jack,

I never change out the coil....
But I am very much a proponent of real CDI (Capacitive Discharge Ignition). When installed, the coil is now a pulse transformer. And with a 300VDC charge, that is one serious pulse. While good secondary insulation is usually adequate, one quickly learns to stay clear while the engine is running.

Chanumière is now running a CDI unit that is a Delta MKXb made in 1975. I think that is just so fitting.

Matt